You need to specify the research philosophy of your study. Your research philosophy can be pragmatism, positivism, realism or interpretivism as discussed below. The reasons behind philosophical classifications of the study need to be provided. You need to discuss the implications of your research philosophy on the research strategy in general and the choice of primary data collection methods in particular.

Research philosophy deals with the source, nature and development of knowledge[1]. In simple terms, a research philosophy is belief about the ways in which data about a phenomenon should be collected, analysed and used.

Research philosophy is a vast topic and here we will not be discussing this topic in great details. In business and economics dissertations at Bachelor’s level, you are not expected to discuss research philosophy in a great level of depth, and about one page in methodology chapter devoted to research philosophy usually suffices. For a business dissertation at Master’s level you may need to provide more discussion of the philosophy of your study, but even there, about two pages of discussions has to be accepted as sufficient by your supervisor.

Now as mentioned above, these claims seem directly opposed to certain other claims Socrates makes. Most importantly, earlier in the Crito itself, Socrates had stressed that “one must never do wrong” (49b). Indeed, this serves as the driving principle behind the rest of his argument in the Crito . But is this really consistent with maintaining that one must always obey the state, if one fails to persuade it that something it orders is wrong? The obvious objection is that the state might well order one to do something wrong–e.g. because one of its laws is an unjust one, as Jim Crow laws were. In that case, Socrates’ claim that one should never do anything wrong would entail refusing to do what the state orders– even if one is unsuccessful in persuading the state that it is wrong. Thus, Socrates’ claim that one should never do wrong seems inconsistent with his claim that one must always obey the final orders of the state.

Clarity and straightforwardness of thought and language are crucial: avoid flowery styles and long, superfluous introductions and conclusions. (No paper should ever start with a sentence like: “Since the dawn of time, mankind has pondered the question of. “) The bulk of your paper should consist of philosophical exposition and analysis, in plain but precise language. If you are writing an essay in response to an assigned essay topic, the most important thing is simply to make sure you answer the question that was asked , carefully and thoroughly. Avoid getting off on tangents that are not crucial to your topic, and avoid sweeping generalizations you can’t support in the paper . In addition to the quality of exposition, one of the central things we look for in a philosophy paper is how well the thesis in question is supported. Even if the reader thinks some of your claims are false, your paper can be excellent if you do a solid job of defending your claims. If you are asked to explain something, do not merely summarize what an author or lecturer has said. Explain and illuminate the relevant ideas or arguments in your own words, as if you were trying to help a fellow student gain a deeper understanding of them. Avoid excessive quotation! Stringing together quotes is not explaining a position or an argument, and does not display your understanding of the material. Even paraphrasing in your own words is not enough. Again, explanation involves clarifying the claims, bringing out hidden assumptions behind arguments, noticing ambiguities as they arise and nailing them down, and so on. In addition to careful explanation of positions or arguments, some paper topics ask for critical evaluation of those positions and arguments. An example of critical evaluation of an argument would be my lecture criticizing Thomson’s argument for the conclusion that abortions wouldn’t violate a fetus’ right to life even if it were granted to have a full right to life. (I developed and used a distinction between positive and negative rights, and argued that the central parallel she appeals to in her argument fails to go through, since it involves a conflation of positive and negative rights.) Some paper topics ask you to do the same sort of thing, and if you’re writing on such a topic, be sure that this component of your paper is strong and well developed. Proofreading of papers is a necessity. So is decent grammar: incoherent grammar makes the effective communication of ideas impossible. As for which topic you choose: You should choose something you’re most interested in and have the most to say about. Beware of any topic that seems too easy: If it seems simple–like something you can dash off in a few paragraphs–then that’s a good sign that you’re not thinking deeply enough about it, and you should probably write on another topic. So choose your topic carefully. This is important : If you use someone else’s words, you have to use quotation marks and cite the source in a footnote. If you don’t, it’s plagiarism, which constitutes cheating and is a violation of the honor code. See note at top.

Note, first of all, the concise, crisp introduction. The problem is plainly stated, and then I explain clearly what I’m going to do in the paper–all in just a few sentences. There’s no rambling introduction with sentences starting with “Since the beginning of time, mankind has pondered the mysteries of etc.”

Now having done that, one might just stop and claim to have answered the question: “No, the various positions are not consistent, and Socrates is just contradicting himself.” But that would be a very superficial paper. Instead, I tried to dig beneath the surface a little bit, and to notice that the central claim can be interpreted in more than one way. So I first of all made a distinction between two possible interpretations, which in turn depended on a distinction between what you might be commanded to do and what you might be commanded to endure . That distinction enabled me to argue for an interpretation of what Socrates is claiming about the moral authority of the state that renders this claim consistent with his other claims. (Noticing and exploiting distinctions is a large part of what doing philosophy is all about.)

Although the idea of knowledge creation may appear to be profound, you are engaged in knowledge creation as part of completing your dissertation. You will collect secondary and primary data and engage in data analysis to answer the research question and this answer marks the creation of new knowledge.

Discussion of research philosophy in your dissertation should include the following:

The choice of a specific research philosophy is impacted by practical implications. There are important philosophical differences between studies that focus on facts and numbers such as an analysis of the impact of foreign direct investment on the level of GDP growth and qualitative studies such as an analysis of leadership style on employee motivation in organizations.

The choice between positivist and interpretivist research philosophies or between quantitative and qualitative research methods has traditionally represented a major point of debate. However, the latest developments in the practice of conducting studies have increased the popularity of pragmatism and realism philosophies as well.

2. Background information (this could also be covered in the introduction)

c) anticipated objections.

c) how the paper will argue that position.

a clear, concise introduction that states what the paper will argue and how several arguments in favor of your position. These arguments should be fully developed, i.e., you should anticipate and refute possible counter-arguments to your points a conclusion that summarizes your position and the way you have argued it.

Fortunately, we can help! We can provide philosophy papers in any subject area. These are just a few of the formats in which we can present the final work for your philosophy paper topic. If you do not see yours listed, just email us.

Below is some interesting research paper topics that you can use, either just as they are or as inspiration for something else! If you are struggling to find a topic, remember it is always a good idea to go small.

Philosophical ideas come in all varieties. Every culture has many philosophies that shape it, and individual philosophies shift depending on who in the culture embodies them and where. Nonetheless, philosophy students can find themselves without any idea where to begin or end when it comes time to choose their philosophy paper topics.

Big ideas are fun and interesting, but part of what makes them fun is that they are big, even hyperbolic! Most students are writing papers that range from one or two, to only ten pages. There is not enough room in those papers to look at whole disciplines or genre. This means that a paper on Pythagoras’ influence on modern thought would be gigantic. A more appropriate topic for a custom paper written for an undergraduate would be something like, Pythagorean thought and modern science fiction television in the U.S.

Our team of editors makes certain that the matter used in your philosophy papers is original and creative. Our papers are done by writers who have complete knowledge of the English language. They know all about the different branches of philosophy. We use very sophisticated language in your papers. The style of your essay is incredibly scrutinized to make sure there are no grammar, spelling, or principle errors. They assure that the philosophy papers you have structured reach you in the greatest possible shape.